March 2017
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Do you have unwanted honey bees swarming in your yard or house?
Please do not kill them! They just need a different location. Help us help honey bees by getting them out of your problem area and putting them back to work producing honey in a safe location!

Swarms are usually removed for free; however, removal of established colonies from within structures normally requires a fee.
Follow these links to an explanation of swarm removals or structure removals

The following local beekeepers offer swarm and honey bee removal services. Click on your location or scroll down the list to find a beekeeper near you or servicing your location.

Hampton, Carrollton, Suffolk; Newport News;Yorktown, Grafton; Williamsburg, James City, New Kent; Gloucester, Middelsex

Name:

Location:

Phone:

Servicing
Area:

Honey Bee Removal

Andy Westrich

Hampton

757-825-8843

Hampton, Newport News, Yorktown, Smithfield, Northern Suffolk and Southern Williamsburg

Swarms & Structures

Dick Parsell

Hampton

757-850-2765

Middle Peninsula

>

Swarms only

Bob Green

Suffolk

757-329-8639

Suffolk, Chesapeake, Portsmouth

Swarms only

Al Banwell

Hampton

757-332-0971
or
757-846-0097

Peninsula

Swarms Only

Kenny Alligood

Carrollton

757-871-8697

Carrollton

Swarms only

Jim Hailey

Hampton

757-871-9792
or
757-846-0097

Peninsula

Swarms, cut-outs, trap-outs

Thomas Webb

Smithfield

757-580-0268

Smithfield

Swarms only

Jud Nierle

Newport News

757-593-6530
or
757-877-5409

Peninsula and Middle Peninsula

Swarms & Structures

Dave Leonard

Newport News

757-713-2744

Peninsula

Swarms only

Neville Pearson

Newport News

(757)877-6996

Newport News, Williamsburg, Hampton, York County

Swarms

Maywood Wilson

Yorktown

757-868-9284

Poquoson, Bethel, Tabb, Hampton close to York County line

Swarms

Joe Thornton

Yorktown

757-898-8411

Hampton, Newport News, Yorktown, Williamsburg

Swarms & Structures

Dale Williams

Yorktown / Hampton

757-254-2454

Hampton, Newport News, Yorktown, Smithfield, Suffolk, Williamsburg, Virginia Beach

Swarms & Structures

Chad Nicolai

Yorktown

571-550-0984

Yorktown, Grafton, Tabb

Swarms only

Carolyn Kutzer-Lovedall

Yorktown

757-435-0797

Hampton, Newport News, Yorktown, Peninsula

Swarms only

Bill Walker

Yorktown

757-617-0342

Peninsula

Swarms only

Scott Bartram

Yorktown

757-867-8547

Peninsula, Gloucester

Swarms & Structures

Gwyn Williams

Yorktown

757-867-6807

Yorktown, Poquoson

Swarms only

Ron Davis

Yorktown

757-865-7641

York County, Poquoson, Newport News, and Hampton

Swarms

Evan Davies

Yorktown/Grafton (nights/weekends)

Williamsburg (weekdays)

(757)969-2359

Williamsburg, York County

Swarms

Greg Sprock

Williamsburg, VA

757-951-3646

Peninsula to New Kent and Surry

Swarms & Structures
, Trap-outs only, No cut-outs.

 Joe Beene

 Williamsburg, VA

 757-345-2424

 Williamsburg

James City

 Swams

Jerry Felix

Williamsburg

757-220-0662

Wiiliamsburg, Toano, Newport News, Yorktown

Swarms only

Steve Kolet & Fran Hurd

Williamsburg

(610)304-4679 or (757)293-8796

New Kent, Toano, Williamsburg, James City

Swarms

Ron Carnegie

Williamsburg

757-814-7671
or
804-241-7259

Williamsburg

Swarms only

Judy Buehler

Williamsburg

303-520-5634

Williamsburg

Swarms only

Kevin Wright

New Kent

757-876-8441

James City County, New Kent, Toano, Upper York County, Williamsburg, and West Point

Swarms and Structures

Kathy Green

James City

757-810-1933

James City, Williamsburg

Swarms only

Kera Recor

Williamsburg

757-719-9399
or
804-241-7259

Peninsula

Swarms only

Joe Mihalcoe

New Kent

804-966-1202
or
804-241-7259

New Kent, Williamsburg, James City, Charles City, King William

Swarms & Structures (trap outs and cut outs)

Don Cole, Back Forty Bees

Williamsburg

757-745-9081

Virginia Beach, Norfolk, Chesapeake, Hampton, Newport News, York County, James City County, New Kent County, Williamsburg

Swarms and Structures (cut outs)

Brenda Johnson-Asnicar

Gloucester

757-334-3367
or
757-846-0097

Peninsula and Middle Peninsula

Swarms

Pete Ostrowski

Gloucester Point

804-815-6535

Middle Peninsula

Swarms & Structures

Chris Conley

Gloucester

804-654-9710

Gloucester, Yorktown

Swarms only

Gary Williams

Northern Gloucester

804-832-0274

Gloucester, Middlesex, Mathews, King & Queen, Lancaster, New Kent

Swarms

Paul Bauer

Gloucester

804-642-5459(H)
or
804-815-0664(C)

Gloucester

Swarms only

Henry Moncure

Gloucester

804-402-1643

Gloucester, Middlesex

Swarms only

Joe Brown

Middlesex

804-776-0401

Middle Peninsula

Swarms only

George & Pam Rountree

Gloucester

804-832-3120)
or
804-832-2977

Gloucester, Mathews, Middlesex, Williamsburg, Newport News

Swarms & Structures

Mac McGee

Gloucester

804-695-2783

Gloucester

Swarms only

Mike Ledoux

Gloucester

804-815-0495

Gloucester, Yorktown, Mathews, Middlesex, King&Queen

Swarms only



 

 

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February Meetings
and Events

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February 4th
Queen Rearing

 

February 21st
Monthly Meeting

 

 

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March Meetings
and Events

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

March 4th
Horticultural Extravaganza
Information Table

 

March 16th
Beginning Beekeeping
(Session 1)

 

March 21st
Monthly Meeting

 

March 23rd
Beginning Beekeeping
(Session 2)

 

March 30th
Beginning Beekeeping
(Session 3)

 

 

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April Meetings
and Events

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

April 6th
Beginning Beekeeping
(Session 4)

 

 

 

Follow the "Upcoming Events" or "Latest News" link under the Main Menu for more information.

 

 

 

NewBees Corner

 

Information listed here is for the new beekeepers looking for new information and guidance on beekeeping and beekeeping chores:

 

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Last week I helped a club member find and remove the queen in a colony that had swarm cells, I worked on the James River and saw an Osprey investigating a nest site, fruit trees were budding and many ornamentals are in bloom, in my home yard I inspected a colony in a 10 frame deep with 8 frames of brood.... This weekend I'm sitting by the wood stove wondering what will survive and if they have the hindsight to ponder "WHAT WAS I THINKING?" There is no way to stop the weather, we can only look ahead and try and do what we can. In Florida an orchard owner may turn on the sprinklers to keep the buds from freezing or maybe light smudge pots, my trees are on their own. I heard of a swarm being caught last week, will that queen cell survive, will the queen get an opportunity for a mating flight, will there be drones to mate with? It is way early in the year and 35 or more days before last frost is forecast for our area. That hive will be doctored up in the weeks ahead when success or failure can be determined. This appears to be a year when those colonies that are a bit slower may win the race. Keep an eye on the forecast and be cautious in your hive manipulations, don't do too much too early! Some colonies may suffer chilled brood as they have to cluster and abandon edges of the brood nest. You'll get to see how hygienic your colonies are. Make sure they have stores close as there are still night time temps in the 30's. The forecast for the next 15 days has 13 days with a chance of rain. If there are drones will they fly, will that queen get a chance to fly? Be cautious when considering making splits. Hang in there, Spring is coming even though you may think it is here already!

 

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So winter is coming and we have these roller coaster days of warm and cold temperatures to deal with. Average temperature for this time of year is 61°, believe it or not! Our coldest days come in January and February. Night time temps are in the mid 40's so the bees are clustering at night and active in the day. But what do they have to feed on? Probably and most unfortunately they are eating up all their winter stores! You need to feed in winter but winter feeding is different. Best to feed liquid on the warm days, 2:1 (2 parts sugar to 1 part water) and then have sugar feed on for the colder days. You can put sugar feed on and then feed liquid when the weatherman calls for a warm spell. Make your liquid feed up fresh or keep it warm, bees will take to 70° syrup better than 50° syrup. Take the liquid off once the temperature drops again as the bees might not take it and a leaking container would be the end of the colony.

Did you know an inner cover has two sides? A shallow summer side that maintains bee space and a deeper winter side that allows for fondant or sugar candy to be placed on the top bars available to the cluster. Here are some links to follow for making winter feed for your colonies. This first method requires cooking and I have used it with great success. To use it, follow this link. Something I've read is that the vinegar is essential to add in the heating process as it aids in breaking down the cane sugar into the sugars that are in honey, fructose and glucose as well as raising the acidity level closer to natural honey.

A second method requires no cooking but letting the moisture evaporate out leaving a solid block. Here are links to two similar methods. I have not used these recipes as yet but have heard some have used them successfully. To use them follow this link for 1 or this link for 2. There is also information on the number 2 site for using the "Mountain Camp" method of feeding dry sugar. I prefer to make my feed in advance and then apply it to the hive but that's beekeeping, each of us has our own preference.

 

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So you were able to harvest some honey but now what do you do with those frames? There are three things that can be done. 1-you could just leave the frames as they are and store them in a freezer or refrigerator. Not very practical for most folks and storing them wet in the garage or house is an invitation to disaster, don't do it! 2-you can let the bees dry them out outside of the hive. This works very well but you must take precautions to prevent a robbing frenzy in your apiary. Put the frames some distance from the hives, the farther the better, and additionally have some objects between, like trees or a building. This also pertains to letting the bees clean up your extracting equipment. There will be some damage to the comb but nothing too drastic. 3-lastly you can put the frames back into the hive they were harvested from or on another colony that may need the stores. If you just want the bees to dry the frames and move the residual honey down into the colony you can place the frames in a super above the inner cover. To keep the bees from moving up add a spacer or an empty super between the inner cover and the frames. Adding the frames back into or on top of a colony may also create a robbing situation if there are any gaps, cracks or openings. Take precautions!

Once dry these frames are a valuable resource and you HAVE to protect them until freezing weather arrives and wax moth activity ceases for the year. There are some choices that can be made here as well. Hanging under a eave allowing plenty of air and light can usually prevent wax moth damage if the combs never held brood or pollen. Follow this link to see some examples. Another way is to protect your frames with Para Dichlorobenzene, Moth crystals. Supers are stacked and sealed with a spacer at the top. Place the moth crystals on a paper plate on top in the space as the fumes will go down. Follow this link to read an article about wax moths and their control. Lastly combs can be protected with a natural microbial bacteria Bacillus thuringenisis (Certan®). It was once available for sale by bee supply companies but is no longer manufactured in the US but is available from Canada. Some beeks use alternative products that contain the same bacteria but are sold under a different name for the similar purpose of larva control. Here is a link to a video about the use of Certan.

 

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